Cindy Sherban, SCBScN, instructor speaks to faculty.

Cindy Sherban, SCBScN, instructor speaks to faculty.

On November 27, 2013 Cindy Sherban spoke to SIAST Instructors about the Marzano and Kendall Taxonomy.  We learned about the historical background to how Bloom’s Taxonomy became the pillar of education since the 1960s.

Marzano and Kendall’s taxonomy was adopted when the Nursing Program was going through a massive program change with a new academic partner and the redevelopment of their program.  Cindy noted that their selection of the taxonomy was based on evidenced based practice.  She also noted that the Taxonomy fits in with reflective practice that the nursing program is based on.

The levels of the Marzano & Kendall Taxonomy.

The levels of the Marzano & Kendall Taxonomy.

You will note that the Marzano & Kendall’s Taxonomy has six levels of processing and that go through three domains of knowledge.  Only Level 1 – Retrieval is seen to be automatic, the other levels mean that the person must consciously  retrieve the information.

While there are a few similarities between Bloom’s Taxonomy and Marzano’s it is not easy to transfer from one system to the other.  The model also has three systems: self, metacognitive and cognitive.  The cognitive system is the only one that has a counterpart in Bloom’s Taxonomy.  The Self-system takes in the learner’s motivation built on importance, efficacy and emotional response.

Two Taxonomies

Two Taxonomies

Cindy noted that it was shown that if learners only focus on cognition that they will have a 21% improvement in outcomes, if the focus is on metacognition the improvement is 26% but the biggest gain is when the focus is on the self-system 27%.

It was noted during the close of the session that the Basic Education Division is using Marzano’s book The Art and Science of Teaching to help instructors in the classroom.

You can listen to the podcast here.

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